The Materialist Philosophers (A Review)

Terry Eagleton is best known as a literary and cultural critic; his sharp pen and sharper wit combined with his erudite Marxist theory to take the Anglo-British academic world by storm. With dozens of books under his belt, employment at a prestigious university, and decades’ worth of intellectual engagement, Eagleton has, in recent years, expanded…

The Big Bhang by Travis Hill (Review)

Stoners, potheads, weed enthusiasts… whatever you want to call them, the point is clear: there is a branch of the society which enjoys cannabis. Indeed, they enjoy it so much that it becomes part of their identity. Enter, the Bob Marley super-fans, the Cheech and Chong groupies, and slightly spaced out college children who seem…

Starship Mine (Review)

Agency, community, and exploration—these are the themes of Peter Cawdron’s Starship Mine, an original novella featuring protagonist James Patterson, a gay space accountant. As with any novella, the themes shape the story. In this case, Earth plays host to an extra-terrestrial message which earthlings receive as a dream; accordingly, it is quickly dubbed ‘The Dream.’ This…

“Stay Alive” with Audio Commentary

(A new series I am starting; I love going through the director’s commentary on movies, so I thought I would share brief thoughts on each track and give the down-low on whether they are worth your time. Also, expect each entry in this series to take license with the movie title.)   Stay Alive is a…

How to Blaspheme: On that Live-Action Death Note trailer.

As you may have heard, Netflix is making a live-action Death Note film. Though the trailer released just a couple weeks ago, it has already generated an immense amount of animosity from fans and ordinary people alike. Why is because of the whitewashing: Death Note, being an Anime program, features, obviously, Asian people; not so in this live-action…

“Literary Gaming”: at the Intersection of the Future

Over the past couple of weeks, I read Astrid Ensslin’s book Literary Gaming. Concise, theoretically dense, and neophyte are all words to describe her project; but, more to the point, they are words which in this case do more than describe, they outline the future of the Humanities. Ensslin’s book is concerned with that intersection of…

Star Wars: The Last Jedi (Quick Take)

At long last, I got to see Star Wars: The Last Jedi with my best buddy last night. Overall, I thought that it was a good movie and not like the other entries in the franchise; one sees story structure, for example, that simply doesn’t exist in the other films. But, I have numerous points…

Bender’s Big Score (Film Notes)

(Well, here we are at long last– our first film! The note format for Bender’s Big Score will be the same as it was for the episode as it is just me commenting on what I find noteworthy. So, pull up a chair and enjoy my rantings on Futurama’s first feature film!) I know this…

On the Dead-Beat Dad Trope

Originally posted on Achilles, Powder & Lead:
The dead-beat dad is such a common phenomenon that it is now a pop-cultural trope. Whereas two generations earlier television and movies reified the nuclear family as a fact of nature, and one generation earlier the depiction of divorced parents became normal, no longer a sin to be overcome…

The Boy Who Lived OR The Fair Unknown?

Originally posted on The (Pop) Culture Medievalist:
If you are reading this post, then you are probably a young person (at heart or literally). Being a Harry Potter fan, you are likely either British or American, as both of those countries have the highest density of fans. But, regardless of whatever nationality you identify as…

Ep.51: Roswell that Ends Well (Notes)

Fry can smell “blue”. Weird. Also, Fry remembers that his grandfather was stationed at Roswell, an interesting detail to remember. The crew travels backward in time in part due to the result of a supernova;s burst with microwaves; the point here is that time-travel is possible in the Futurama universe, no matter how nonsensical it…

Captain America: The Winter Soldier (Micro-Review)

For a radical Leftist, I actually enjoyed Captain America: The Propaganda Soldier.  I mean… winter soldier. The story isn’t something I will spend much time on. The crux of the matter revolves around Hydra coming to light as a force inside Shield; found from “ex-nazis”, Hydra intends on killing mass amounts of people in order to…