Near-Death Wish (Notes)

The Clippie Awards: rewarding the “most promising delivery boys.” Obviously a local ceremony, one has to wonder what organization does this since it involves both children and adults. Yet, the ceremony has an intergalactic impact since the robot on the Near-Death star knew who Fry was when he presented his award. Labor unions of the future are…

Free Will Hunting (Notes)

The crux of this episode revolves around Bender and whether or not he has free will. Though the episode does involve existentialism to the degree that Bender can not– technically– find meaning in a meaningless world (so he cannot live in existential Despair or Dread), the episode’s deeper function should actually be on (universal) rights (as…

iBoy (Review)

Yeah, it’s bad. The movie, that is: a stinker for Netflix. But, you knew that already, didn’t you? What gave it away? For me, it was the fact that it had the moniker of a popular technology brand (“i”) in its title. That’s never a good sign. So, the gist of the film is like…

Austerity Apparatus (J. Moufawad-Paul)

In the political sphere, we are used to Left-wing literature. The controversies of such surround us whenever we hear of a protest against a book launch or death threats against an indigenous author critiquing settler-capitalism. But, in a field dominated by such thinkers as David Harvey and Alain Badiou we often miss texts by lesser-known intellectuals….

The End of the F***ing World (Review)

Let’s get this out of the way– there are many great aspects to End of the F***ing World: great acting, a stellar soundtrack, and a premise you don’t see very often, like a teenage wannabe killer trying his hand at murder. It’s all very quaint; like walking into your living room and finding your dog humping…

The Six Million Dollar Mon (Notes)

Hermes is one dedicated pencil pusher– he goes into a job expecting to fire a hated co-worker and ends up firing himself out of sheer disdain for his lack of productivity and drain on resources. Astounding. A rare instance of the system eating itself. Hermes performance reviews are one of the main drains on profit…

The Dangerous Book for Boys

Let me get right into the heart of the matter– The Dangerous Book for Boys attempts to ape Gortimer Gibbon’s Life on Normal Street and fails. Roughly. Much like its much more positively received counter-part, Byran Cranston’s project fills each episode with a moral lesson for its young audience. Unlike that much more positively received show,…

“Morning Star” by Pierce Brown (Review)

It is the last star to fade before the morning comes—this is how Morning Star defines its namesake. It is meant to signify the solitary nature of a leader and their lonely road. Just the same, it could also signify the final installment of a beloved trilogy before the inevitable ruin of ‘the end’ pours across the…

Benderama (Notes)

Zoidberg is devestated when Hermes says that “due to budget cuts, we will no longer be offering complimentary squid guts.” Poor Zoidberg. Literally. Banach-Tarski Dulpa-Shrinker: invention that allows the professor to create two smaller copies out of anything that fits. Looks like an old elementary school projector. Let’s get this out of the way– the…

Law & Oracle (Notes)

On the video game Delivery Command, after Fry is killed, the screen displays an FBI warning that says “Winners Don’t Play Videogames.” Man, the FBI of the future really concerns itself with a lot of things we wouldn’t concern ourselves with. It is interesting that Fry’s life at the start of this episode perfectly mimics,…

Great North Road (Review)

As any dedicated reader of my reviews will have noted, I review a lot of… well, ‘crap’. True steam piles. I read a lot of texts which function little better than first drafts riddled with more spelling, grammar, and punctuation errors than a sixth grader’s Harry Potter fanfic. Naturally, it is nice to sojourn every once in…

How Meta: A Micro-Review of Alex Foster’s “Book Reviews”

In the practice of full disclosure, I misread the title of this book and led myself to believe that it was a book on how to review literature, not on how to get reviews. Big difference. This is fine, though, because the idea behind Alex Foster’s short pamphlet is that writers need to be proactive, disciplined, and mature when…